Increased traffic can slow any network without proper setup, even the Olympics

Home » Data Solutions » Increased traffic can slow any network without proper setup, even the Olympics

Increased traffic can slow any network without proper setup, even the Olympics

In today’s society, the need for instant information is commonplace, and the current Summer Olympic Games in London is experiencing this first hand, the good and the bad. Fans and athletes alike are logging onto social media sites like Twitter to share a plethora of information and opinion, but all the sharing is causing, unforeseen problems.

A new article from CNN christened the 2012 games as “the first ‘Twitter’ Olympics,” and it’s easy to see why. So far during the festivities, the social media website has been at the forefront of a number of events including athlete dismissals over racist comments, feuds between competitors and commentators and fan outrage over outcomes being spoiled before NBC can air the events on tape delay.

While the coverage of the games is unlike any that has been seen before, the increased traffic on London’s network is causing concern. The men’s road cycling event over the weekend was plagued by a lack of accurate timing information. This missing information left commentators and fans unaware of what was going on, and the issue was traced to the oversaturation of the network, as fans kept sending text messages and tweets.

In the digital age, a strong network infrastructure is more important than ever before. From large events like the Olympics to small startup companies, preventing a system slowdown is crucial to keep a business running in top form.

These network concerns could have struck much closer to home if Chicago was successful in landing the 2016 Games. Businesses in the Windy City would have needed to turn to a Chicago network support provider like CTI Technology to ensure increased traffic wouldn’t slow down the flow of information.

Article on: Increased traffic can slow any network without proper setup, even the Olympics

by

This missing information left commentators and fans unaware of what was going on, and the issue was traced to the oversaturation of the network, as fans kept sending text messages and tweets.

By | 2012-08-01T15:53:09+00:00 August 1st, 2012|Data Solutions|0 Comments

About the Author:

As Chief Executive Officer of CTI Technology, my responsibility is to create an organization that transcends in employee culture, vision, and market positioning in a rapidly-changing technology industry. My passion is to guide and come alongside new leaders, helping them become tomorrow’s rock stars. My life’s mantra is to MAKE IT HAPPEN; I will do just that.

Leave A Comment