Individual user experience shapes BYOD practice

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Individual user experience shapes BYOD practice

One of the major benefits to bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies is that companies can save on hardware because the strategy uses an employee's own technology. Instead of spending money on a number of devices, organizations can instead invest in other beneficial solutions like networking options or cloud computing.

However, while many business solutions have stringent protocols and safety restrictions, the very nature of BYOD means rules need to be broad. It is highly improbable that any two employee's devices would be the same model, have the same applications and be used the same way out of the office.

This adds a unique level to BYOD policies. Each worker is going to have a different experience with technology as everyone has their own preferences. Fanboys of one brand – like Apple – may be much more comfortable with using a smartphone if they have been using an iPhone for the last four years, as opposed to someone you just bought the Windows Phone 8.

According to a report from UC Strategies, this is a factor that often gets put on the backburner by IT departments and executives.

"This concentration may cause businesses to overlook one very important issue: the enterprise and technology benefits that BOYD offers may be subverted if end users are unable to utilize a consistent experience," reads the report.

BYOD practices are approaching inevitability in offices across the country. While not every workforce will be able to completely run daily business functions from an iPad, many can handle smaller tasks like checking email. Part of the main draw of smartphones and tablets is the user experience and IT departments need to make sure their maintenance strategy – which an experienced IT consulting firm can help create – does not infringe upon that.

Article on: Individual user experience shapes BYOD practice

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BYOD practices are approaching inevitability in offices across the country. While not every workforce will be able to completely run daily business functions from an iPad, many can handle smaller tasks like checking email.

By | 2012-11-28T19:32:47+00:00 November 28th, 2012|Unified Communications|0 Comments

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As Chief Executive Officer of CTI Technology, my responsibility is to create an organization that transcends in employee culture, vision, and market positioning in a rapidly-changing technology industry. My passion is to guide and come alongside new leaders, helping them become tomorrow’s rock stars. My life’s mantra is to MAKE IT HAPPEN; I will do just that.

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